The Truth About The Green Burial Movement

Green burial is a new concept in funeral arrangements. It’s more environmentally friendly than traditional burial because it uses less energy and produces fewer greenhouse gases. But what exactly is green burial?
Green burial means that the body decomposes naturally, without embalming or other toxic chemicals. In fact, typically in a biodegradable casket made of materials like wood or wicker.

One company making this possible for people who want to go green is Fungi Burial Suit co-founders David Alpaugh and Christina Agapakis. They invented mushroom suits that consume human bodies quickly using enzymes found in fungi to break down tissue. In the process turning the remains into nutrient-rich soil for plants to grow. This is better than burying them underground where they can decompose.

What is a Green Burial and Why Would I Want One

Overall, funeral services have become a $20 billion industry. In fact, companies are doing everything from cremations and burials to mummification and pre-need arrangements. But the death business is booming because many people find talk of what happens after life morbid. In addition, grieving loved ones must contend with lifeless remains that are often difficult to deal with in any condition.

This has led funeral directors into an awkward position. They want their clients’ final moments to look as nice as possible. However, also reducing the emotional burden on surviving friends family members at funerals. They do this by making it look like the dead person was just sleeping peacefully before moving onto heaven (or hell).

The human body accumulates 219 toxins over a lifetime. When the body is buried these toxic chemicals are released into the soil or groundwater. These include pesticides like DDT; heavy metals such as lead and mercury. In addition, flame retardants resist heat but also accumulate in the fat tissue of animals who eat them. Thus poisoning their organs if consumed by humans (e.g., PBBs). Also, Bisphenol A found in plastics which can cause reproductive problems for both sexes at low exposure levels.

The human body develops numerous chemicals due to the consumption of food items combined with environmental surroundings. Yet these become even more harmful once they enter our system. Furthermore, this accumulation leads to physical damage from 229 different pollutants entering the bloodstream through digestion alone- including pesticides.

It is a sad truth that we inadvertently affect the environment while living our daily lives. More and more people are coming to realize how human bodies can continue their negative effects on Earth. Even after death. This happens due to standardized practices in funerals like embalming with formaldehyde. These saturated fluids and/or cremations cause toxins released from the body to permeate into the air, water, soil all of nature.

The process of decomposition in the ground

Generally, people in the US choose one of two types of funeral traditions:

  • Cremation -burning the corpse to ashes. It is a method that reduces environmental impact and cost. However, it can still be expensive because you must purchase an urn or other receptacle for your loved ones remains.
  • Burial – Putting corpses six feet under ground with a concrete slab on top which has been said to pollute more than cremation does. When taking into account transportation emissions from transporting bodies over long distances, not just burial gasoline as well as potential groundwater contamination from chemicals used during embalming processes.

Many different chemicals are used in the process of embalming, including methanol and formaldehyde. These fluids not only slow down decomposition but also leach out once a body finally starts to break down after years on end – contaminating the soil with toxins.

The process of cremation is a lengthy procedure that requires 28 gallons worth of fuel. This is used to transform one’s body into ashes. In addition, the toxic compounds released by this process are often found in acid rain. This can cause adverse effects on people’s health.

Funeral services have come a long way. The cost of burial and cremation has more than tripled since the 1960s. However, people are still choosing to go for it instead of cheaper alternatives. For example, like being buried or having their ashes scattered in nature.

The average funeral these days costs between $8000 and $12000. That’s including caskets starting at around $3000 or more.t While cremations only set you back to about half those numbers. This is contributed to how time-consuming they can be due to all the preparation involved before incinerating someone’s remains into ash. It is then disposed of by scattering them somewhere natural such as out on an open field. In addition, there will also typically be some type of ceremony held. In some cases afterward contributing to 43% of Americans choose cremation

The Green Burial Alternative

Green burial is quickly becoming the first choice for environmentally conscious Americans. It has a minimal impact on Earth, which prevents unnecessary deforestation and other harmful consequences that are bad for our planet’s health in general. Green burials also conserve natural resources by cutting down on wasteful practices such as embalming chemicals and caskets while reducing landfill space usage from traditional cremations or burying methods.

In recent years, more people have begun to choose ‘green’ options when it comes to funeral arrangements due largely in part to their concern about how they’re going affect the environment after death – especially with respect to things like potential forest depletion over time if there were no restrictions of artificial materials used during green funerals (i-e: vaults).

Green burials allow people to leave this world peacefully, with as little carbon footprint as possible and while also being cost-effective.

How Does a Mushroom Suit Work

Imagine a suit made of mushroom spores that decomposes you when your body eventually dies. That’s what it is like to be buried wearing an Infinity Burial Suit, designed by Coeio in New York City and handmade from cotton. These suits are crafted with the help of microorganisms and other mycelium mushrooms found on small farms across America as well as abroad. While not all humans have been exposed to these fungi before now, they’re actually harmless if ingested or inhaled – so don’t worry about having dreams for weeks after getting laid out with one!

Again, the suits are made from fabric that contains mushroom spores. They decompose the body and neutralize toxins before mixing with soil, then act as nutrients for plants while biodegrading themselves too!

What is The Process and How Does The Mushroom Burial Suit Work

Once the suit is buried in soil, mycelia start to break down any organic matter that may be present. Mushrooms are known for their self-seeking nature and act as a natural filter by neutralizing toxins and heavy metals when they consume them. This process of breaking down through biosorption is called Mycoremediation.

The fungi are a natural solution to decomposing and detoxifying toxins. They break the molecular bonds by binding them with chelation in heavy metals that makes these dangerous substances harmless for humans, animals, and plants alike while also returning nutrients back into the soil so they can be reused again.

The mushroom burial suit is more than just a fungal solution to pollution and climate change, but an edible compost that helps the earth thrive. The fungi devour your body’s toxins leaving behind clean soil when they’re done eating you alive. They also leave us with familiar mushrooms like shitake and oyster which help keep the ground fertile as well!

Why is The Mushroom Burial Suit Considered a Green Burial

With the growing popularity of green burials, more and more cemeteries are allowing this practice. People who want to combine their traditional burial with a green one can easily do so by putting the body in a mushroom suit inside of a coffin before burying it four feet deep into an area that is filled with wood chips for nutrients. The mushrooms will speed up decomposition while also being eco-friendly and sustainable!

One of the most common forms is a burial on private property. Depending on human laws in different states, this can happen but one should verify its legality before deciding to do so. People who wish for mushroom suit burials must inform family members about it beforehand so that they may fulfill it when the time comes and not be upset by their loved ones’ wishes being denied due to ignorance or lack thereof of how things work legally around these sorts of funerals.

How Much Is The Mushroom Burial Suit Going To Cost Me

A mushroom burial suit is a new and innovative way to have your loved one buried. These suits are often made of natural fibers, like hemp or cotton. There’s no need for embalming fluids because mushrooms will break down the body in just days! The best part? You can purchase this environmentally-friendly option for an affordable $1,500 price tag with other options available around that range too for pets.

Is it safe for my family to visit me after I die

Yes!

The green funeral is a great choice for eco-friendly people. The environmental benefits of these types of funerals are undeniable, and they also save money because the ceremony costs less to conduct than traditional ceremonies do. However, it’s important that you have an open discussion with your family about this decision before going through it in order to clear up any misconceptions or objections from them beforehand – not after!

Where Can I Get More Information About this Type of Burial

The Coeio website offers a uniquely designed burial suit that uses mushrooms to cover the netting fabric. This bio-mix is referred to as “ninja pajamas.” The site also provides detailed instructions about how this product can be purchased and delivered in two weeks or less, with shipping being free of charge within US territories!

Conclusion

I’m not sure there is a single answer to these questions. In the end, it all comes down to preference and what you are most comfortable with. If you want more information from people who have actually tried green burial or mushroom suit (or both), get in touch with us! We can help provide some insight into which option might be best for your needs.